Herman Cain’s Tax Plan

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When it comes to taxes and being told what’s going to cost me more money and what’s going to save me money, I generally don’t believe the Press, or the person touting the plan.  What I do believe is taking what I pay in taxes now and comparing that to the new plan.

This is what I did when comparing the “savings” Paul Ryan’s plan touted.  This is what I have done with Herman Cain’s plan.

Now, there is something I’d like to add.  Mr. Cain has not made public a lot of details about his plan.  It is possible that I am making incorrect assumptions.  I am listing the assumptions that I have made before the comparison – if anyone knows for a fact that the Cain plan doesn’t do any one of these, please leave a comment and I will make adjustments.

  • No deductions: personal exemption, neither Medical nor the Standard Deduction.
  • Taxes on everything: food, gas, clothing and bills such as electric and cable.
  • Even though when I purchase my next home or car – and only if Cain’s plan passes – I would pay a 9% sales tax on the home or car, I did not include this in my car payments, nor in my mortgage payments.  I made the assumption that the 9% tax would not be retroactive.  Therefore; in my total spending, I did not include my mortgage nor car payments.

I picked last month for my spending.  I figured September is a typical month for me.  Some months I might spend more and some months, I spend less.  For comparison purposes, I included Paul Ryan’s plan in my chart.

 

Current

Ryan’s Plan

Cain’s Plan

Salary

$5,416.67

$5,416.67

$5,416.67

Insurance Deduction

$253.44

$0.00

$0.00

Personal Exemption

$291.67

$316.67

$0.00

Standard Deduction

$483.33

$1,041.67

$0.00

Taxable Income

$4,388.23

$4,058.33

$5,416.67

Federal Income Tax

$784.18

$1,014.58

$487.50

National Sales Tax

$0.00

$0.00

$399.09

Total Tax

$784.18

$1,014.58

$886.59

%

17.87%

25.00%

9.00%

This is based on one month’s salary and all the spending for the household.  In the month of September between bills (cable, electric, cell phone, etc.), food, household items and misc. items (books, software), I spent $4,434.30.

As you can see, I currently pay – each month – $787.18 in Federal Income Tax (after deductions, which really aren’t taken out until the end of the year, but I wanted this to be a fair comparison – apples to apples).  Under the Cain Plan, I will only have $487.50 taken out of my paycheck for Federal Taxes.  That’s a savings of $299.68.  That sounds pretty good.

But, wait – there’s more…

Once the addition of the sales tax on $4,434.30 of goods and services is paid, my federal tax bill is raised by $399.09 – almost $100 more than the initial savings.  This brings my total taxes under Herman Cain’s plan up to $886.59!  Clearly, the Cain Plan is not a winner for me.

Let’s deal with the critics on this.  I’m sure some people are saying, “Just spend less.”  Hmmm, nice idea, but then what’s the point?  If, in order to save taxes, I slow down my spending, then for what am I working?  What’s my motivation for earning more money?  What do I get and how does the economy get rolling along if I cut my spending in half?

Let’s say I only spend the essentials – cut out the extras, like eating out or my passion for books – what happens then?

Well, I would save $52.80 in taxes each month.  And, sure, I could sock the extra money away in savings, but who wants to live like that?  I don’t drive up to Brookfield every single day to not enjoy the money I spend.  I sock away savings and money for retirement, but then I enjoy life.

And, how will I pay for that next car?  Sure, I could use my savings, but when the average car price is around $20,000 an extra 9.0% in sales tax is really going to make a huge difference.  That adds – without any other taxes or licensing fees – and extra $1,800 to the price of my new car.

Perhaps, Cain’s plan won’t take food or, maybe, cars will be exempt.  Wouldn’t that be subsidizing certain industries and isn’t that one of the ways we ended up in this mess in the first place?

Here’s what I recommend – don’t take my word on whether or not you like the Cain Plan.  Do the math for yourself.  Figure out exactly how much more or how much less you’ll pay in taxes.  Come to your own conclusion.  That’s what we should really be doing anyway.  Checking out the plans and weighing our options.

Happy Calculating!

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